Bat Habitat Assessment & Mist Netting

Bat Habitat Assessment & Mist Netting

Bat Habitat Assessment & Mist Netting

One of our Section 7 ESA services included this bat habitat assessment and mist netting project for a planned resource extraction site, mist netting was employed following the 2016 Range Wide Indiana Bat Summer Survey Guidelines. Prior to sampling a summer and winter habitat assessment was performed. In Harlan County, Kentucky an approximately 300 acre tract of land was surveyed and clearance was recommended due to no captures of Threatened or Endangered species. Biological Systems Consultants’ bat survey team is equipped to take on all of your bat survey needs. Our staff is fully permitted and qualified to conduct surveys for the endangered Indiana Bat (Myotis sodalis), threatened Northern Long Eared Bat (Myotis septentrionalis) and other bats throughout much of their range, and has extensive experience with habitat assessments, summer and fall mist-net surveys and mine portal surveys, and acoustic monitoring and analysis. If you have any questions about your Section 7 ESA compliance or the new 4(d) rule issued for the Northern Long Eared bat, or have been requested to address bats on your project for any reason, please give us a call and we will be happy to walk you through the process and take care of all your bat survey needs. Contact us or request a quote today.

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Bat Habitat Assessment & Mist Netting

Mist Net Station

Bat Habitat Assessment & Mist Netting

Mist Net Station

Bat Facts: The Indiana bat(Myotis sodalis) was originally listed as being in danger of extinction under the  Endangered Species Preservation Act of 1966 (32 FR 4001, March 11, 1967), and is currently listed as endangered under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) of 1973, as amended. Their scientific name, myotis sodalis, means “mouse ears” (myotis) and “companion” (sodalis). They feed on small insects and have a typical lifespan of 14 years. After hibernation, Indiana bats move toward hardwood forests, where the females will congregate together under the loose bark of trees for their babies, and the males will roost by themselves.