Kentucky Bat Survey

Kentucky Bat Survey

During this bat survey for a planned resource extraction site (surface and underground highwall/auger coal mining) mist net and acoustic sampling was employed. Prior to sampling a summer and winter habitat assessment was performed to identify the amount of and potential for habitat presence. The Kentucky Bat Survey (Whitley County) was performed on an approximately 120 acre tract of land was surveyed and clearance was recommended due to no captures of Threatened or Endangered species. Biological Systems Consultants’ bat survey team is equipped to take on all of your bat survey needs. Our staff is fully permitted and qualified to conduct surveys for the endangered Indiana Bat (Myotis sodalis), threatened Northern Long Eared Bat (Myotis septentrionalis), and endangered Gray Bat (Myotis grisescens) throughout much of their range, and has extensive experience with habitat assessments, summer and fall mist-net surveys and mine portal surveys, and acoustic monitoring and analysis. If you have any questions about your Section 7 ESA compliance or the new 4(d) rule issued for the Northern Long Eared bat, or have been requested to address bats on your project for any reason, please give us a call and we will be happy to walk you through the process and take care of all your bat survey needs. Contact us or request a quote today.  See additional services here or read more about this topic here.

Kentucky Bat Survey Mist Net

Mist Net Site

Kentucky Bat Survey

Bat Survey Station

Kentucky Bat Survey

Mist Net Site

 

Northern Long-eared Bat Facts: According to the USFWS website the following paragraphs describe potential summer and winter habitat for this species:

Winter Habitat: Northern long-eared bats spend winter hibernating in caves and mines, called hibernacula.  They use areas in various sized caves or mines with constant temperatures, high humidity, and no air currents.  Within hibernacula, surveyors find them hibernating most often in small crevices or cracks, often with only the nose and ears visible.

Summer Habitat: During the summer, northern long-eared bats roost singly or in colonies underneath bark, in cavities or in crevices of both live trees and snags (dead trees).  Males and non-reproductive females may also roost in cooler places, like caves and mines.  Northern long-eared bats seem to be flexible in selecting roosts, choosing roost trees based on suitability to retain bark or provide cavities or crevices.  This bat has also been found rarely roosting in structures, like barns and sheds.