Jurisdictional Determination – Whitley County, Kentucky

Jurisdictional Determination projects were conducted at these Kentucky sites in the last couple months. One project was determined to not require a permit while the other was found to contain one jurisdictional intermittent stream channel.

Jurisdictional Determinations are conducted by BSC personnel in support of the requirements of Section 404 of the Clean Water Act (CWA) to identify “waters of the U.S.” as identified by the United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE). Field surveys for the determination were conducted in accordance with the 1987 USACE Wetlands Delineation Manual (USACE, 1987) and the Final Regional Supplement for the Piedmont and Eastern Mountains Region (USACE, 2012). BSC investigators also evaluate the potential for federal jurisdiction under Section 404 of the CWA over aquatic features in the study area based on USACE revised guidance published December 2, 2008. In addition we conduct determinations in accordance with the new “waters rule” that is now in effect in 26 states.

Kentucky contains seven Level III ecoregions. These ecoregions were defined by similarities in geology, physiography, vegetation, climate, soils, land use, wildlife, and hydrology. The proposed project area is located within the Central Appalachians ecoregion (69) which drains 23,698 square miles. Specifically, the project is within the Level IV ecoregion 69e (Cumberland Mountain Thrust Block) which encompasses 1,083 square miles. The topography in this area is characterized as highly dissected, hilly and mountainous plateau with steep ridges, very narrow ridge tops, narrow valleys, and deep coves. 69e contains elevations ranging from approximately 980’- 4,139’ in Kentucky and contains streams with high gradients, waterfalls, many riffles, few pools, and cobble or boulder substrates (Woods et al., 2002).

Contact us today to discuss your upcoming project needs.

Kentucky Drone Services

Kentucky Drone Services are provided by our FAA certified drone pilots. Our EcoDrones can provide a wide variety of site assessment data including Thermal Imagery, Low Elevation Video Data, Construction Monitoring or Surveillance, Aerial Imagery, Spill Monitoring and Assessment, Legal Exhibits, and a wide variety of other environmental or ecological habitat assessment or other ecological studies using drones. Contact us today or request a quote for Kentucky Drone Services. We specialize in tailoring our projects to meet specific needs. Read more here.

Indiana Bat Surveys

Indiana Bat Surveys are conducted by our certified bat biologists. This bat survey for a planned resource extraction site (surface and underground highwall/auger coal mining) mist net and acoustic sampling was employed. Prior to sampling a summer and winter habitat assessment was performed to identify the amount of and potential for habitat presence. This Indiana Bat Survey (Whitley County) was performed on an approximately 120 acre tract of land was surveyed and clearance was recommended due to no captures of Threatened or Endangered species. Biological Systems Consultants’ bat survey team is equipped to take on all of your bat survey needs. Our staff is fully permitted and qualified to conduct surveys for the endangered Indiana Bat (Myotis sodalis), threatened Northern Long Eared Bat (Myotis septentrionalis), and endangered Gray Bat (Myotis grisescens) throughout much of their range, and has extensive experience with habitat assessments, summer and fall mist-net surveys and mine portal surveys, and acoustic monitoring and analysis. If you have any questions about your Section 7 ESA compliance or the new 4(d) rule issued for the Northern Long Eared bat, or have been requested to address bats on your project for any reason, please give us a call and we will be happy to walk you through the process and take care of all your bat survey needs. Contact us or request a quote today.  See additional services here or read more about this topic here.

Indiana and Northern Long-eared Bat Surveys

Indiana and Northern Long-eared Bat Surveys

Biological Systems Consultants’ bat survey team is equipped to take on all of your bat survey needs. Our staff is fully permitted and qualified to conduct surveys for the endangered Indiana Bat (Myotis sodalis), threatened Northern Long Eared Bat (Myotis septentrionalis), and endangered Gray Bat (Myotis grisescens) throughout much of their range, and has extensive experience with habitat assessments, summer and fall mist-net surveys and mine portal surveys, and acoustic monitoring and analysis. If you have any questions about your Section 7 ESA compliance or the new 4(d) rule issued for the Northern Long Eared bat, or have been requested to address bats on your project for any reason, please give us a call and we will be happy to walk you through the process and take care of all your bat survey needs.

Contact us or request a quote today.

Indiana and Northern Long-eared Bat Surveys
Mist Net Station

Aerial Ecological Assessments

Aerial ecological assessments using the newest technology (EcoDrones) available to us we have now integrated aerial imaging into our list of services. Our custom built EcoDrones (UAVs, sUAS) allow us to capture low-elevation high resolution color video or still photos for ecological assessments of watersheds. This allows us to further document ecological resources in a way we have not been previously capable. Environmental assessments will never be the same.

Using drone technology we can provide ecological assessments using low-elevation high-resolution imagery of the ecosystem within a project area or site. Restoring and maintaining the natural environment continues to be an important issue.  BSC specializes in helping clients solve the challenges of growing their businesses while addressing environmental concerns.

We conduct ecological assessments including biological, aquatic, fish, bird, plant, tree, wetland, stream habitat, and other natural resource assessments. BSC provides expertise in both water resources and aquatic systems management, which requires the understanding  of input and output relationships between water systems and their its influence on natural processes. We develop client specific solutions that protect sensitive resources and infrastructure including roads, wetland habitat, rivers, streams, recreational facilities, and infrastructure.

Our client was looking to open a new operation, and hired BSC to perform a preliminary evaluation on an area encompassing 2,000 acres. Our study identified the potential of the proposed mines impacts to archaeological resources, streams and wetlands, prepared a stream restoration plan for the SMCRA permit, a jurisdictional determination or the Corps of Engineers (section 404), and a Section 401 (Water Quality Certification) for the State of Kentucky. The Corps permit was able to be avoided by revising the footprint of the permit while still achieving an economically beneficial project.

 

Tennessee Hydrologic Determination

Tennessee Hydrologic Determination (HDT) and Jurisdictional Determinations (JD) are conducted by our trained field staff and follow the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation Division of Water Pollution ControlGuidance For Making Hydrologic Determinations. This is required by law within the state of Tennessee under the following statute.

The following is taken from the TN statute:

Public Chapter No. 464 PUBLIC ACTS, 2009 1
STATE OF TENNESSEE
PUBLIC CHAPTER NO. 464
SENATE BILL NO. 632
Tennessee Code Annotated, Section 69-3-103, is amended by
adding the following language as new, appropriately designated subsections:
( ) “Wet weather conveyance” means, notwithstanding any other law or
rule to the contrary, man-made or natural watercourses, including natural
watercourses that have been modified by channelization:
(1) That flow only in direct response to precipitation runoff in their
immediate locality;
(2) Whose channels are at all times above the groundwater table;
(3) That are not suitable for drinking water supplies; and
(4) In which hydrological and biological analyses indicate that,
under normal weather conditions, due to naturally occurring ephemeral or
low flow there is not sufficient water to support fish, or multiple
populations of obligate lotic aquatic organisms whose life cycle includes
an aquatic phase of at least two months;

( ) “Obligate lotic aquatic organisms” means organisms that require
flowing water for all or almost all of the aquatic phase of their life cycles;

( ) “Stream” means a surface water that is not a wet weather conveyance;

( ) “Watercourse” means a man-made or natural hydrologic feature with a
defined linear channel which discretely conveys flowing water, as opposed to
sheet-flow;

 

Contact us or request a quote for your hydrologic determination today.

Kentucky Cultural Resource Management

Kentucky Cultural Resource Management Services include historic structures survey related to Section 106 compliance. This historic structures survey was conducted to identify any potential cultural historic resources that might potentially be eligible for listing in the National Register of Historic Places.The below resource was identified and evaluated during the project. To see a list of all of our services go here. Contact us or request a quote today.

 

Kentucky Cultural Resource Management

 

Kentucky Cultural Resource Management

Geographic Information System – GIS

Geographic Information System – GIS  projects are performed by our GIS specialists. Biological Systems Consultants gathers data for related mapping, design, and integration into many types of projects including mining related projects, invasive species studies, eel grass assessments, stream restoration, aggregate and coal stockpiles, construction , environmental assessments, cumulative impact assessments, archaeological surveys, and many other types of projects. GIS provides us the ability to analyze, gather, and organize data.  GIS technology assists our clients in accomplishing operations and maintenance tasks more quickly and efficiently. Our GIS technicians work closely with staff to develop a final product that meets individual project needs within the budget.

Biological Systems Consultants uses the latest GIS and drone (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle) technology to collect and develop geographic data for your projects. Our GIS technicians are ESRI trained and also utilize technology such as GPS and field data collectors to enhance field data acquisition, which allows us to provide comprehensive service to meet all of your needs.

See additional services here.

Macroinvertebrate Collection and Analysis | Aquatic Assessments

Macroinvertebrate Collection and Analysis | Aquatic Assessments – The following steps are taken from the KDOW SOP manual, and describe the methodology for collecting a multi-habitat sample in a wadeable stream:

“1. The investigator will sample a variety of non-riffle habitats with the aid of an 800 x
900 μm mesh triangular or D-frame dip net.
2. Each habitat will be sampled in at least three (3) replicates.
3. After all habitats have been sampled, the contents of the mesh wash bucket will be
composited into a glass, sampling jar with 95% ETOH.
4. The wash bucket will be picked clean of any remaining macroinvertebrates.
5. The sample jar will be labeled with appropriate information (Section 8.D.) and will be
ready for transport to the lab for analysis.
6. Each of these following habitats will be sampled:

A. Undercut Banks/Root Mats
1. These are sampled by placing a large root wad into a triangular or D-frame dip
net and shaking vigorously.
2. The contents are removed from the dip net and placed into a mesh wash bucket.
3. If undercut banks are present in both run and pool areas, each is sampled
separately with three (3) replicates.

B. Marginal Emergent Vegetation (exclusive of water willow, Justicia Americana, beds)
1. This habitat is sampled by thrusting (i.e., “jabbing”) the dip net into the
vegetation for approximately 1m, and then sweeping through the area to collect
dislodged organisms.
2. Material is then rinsed in the wash bucket and any sticks, leaves and vegetation
are thoroughly washed and inspected before discarding.

C. Bedrock or Slab-Rock Habitats
1. These habitats are sampled by placing the edge of the dip net flush on the
substrate, and disturbing approximately 0.1 m2 of area to dislodge attached
organisms.
2. Material is emptied into a wash bucket, rinsed, inspected for organisms, and
discarded.

D. Justicia americana (water willow) Beds
1. These are sampled by working the net through a 1m section in a jabbing
motion.
2. The material is then emptied into a wash bucket and any J. americana stems
are thoroughly washed, inspected and discarded.

E. Leaf Packs
1. Leaf packs are preferably collected from “conditioned” (i.e., not new-fall
material) material when possible.
2. Samples are taken from a diversity of habitats (i.e., riffles, runs and pools) and
placed into the wash bucket.
3. The material is thoroughly rinsed to dislodge organisms, inspected and
discarded.

F. Silt, Sand, and Fine Gravel
1. A U.S. No. 10 sieve is used to sort larger invertebrates (e.g., mussels,
burrowing mayflies, dragonfly larvae) from silt, sand and fine gravel by scooping
the substrate to an approximate depth of 5cm.
2. A variety of collection sites are sampled in order to obtain three (3) replicates
in each substrate type where available (silt, sand and fine gravel).

G. Aufwuchs Sample
1. Small invertebrates associated with this habitat are obtained by washing a small
amount of rocks, sticks, leaves, filamentous algae and moss into a medium-sizedbucket half filled with water.
2. The material is then elutriated and sieved with the nitex sampler/mesh.

H. Rock Picking
1. Benthic macroinvertebrates are picked from 15 rocks (large cobble/small
boulders; 5 each from riffle, run and pool).
2. Selected rocks are washed in a bucket half filled with water and then carefully
inspected to remove organisms.

I. Wood Sample
1. Pieces of submerged wood, ranging from roughly 3 to 6 meters (10 to 20 linear
feet) in length and ranging from 5–15 cm (2–6 inches) in diameter, are
individually rinsed into the wash bucket.
2. Pieces of wood are inspected for burrowers and crevice dwellers and are
removed with fine-tipped forceps.
3. Large diameter, well-aged logs should be inspected and handpicked with finetipped
forceps.”

After the samples have been processed our aquatic entomologists identify each organism and provide an analysis of the results.

To read more about our macroinvertebrate samples see here. If you would like to discuss your project or have questions contact us or request a quote.

NPDES BMP and SPCC Plans

NPDES BMP SPCC Plans

NPDES Permit BMP and SPCC Plans

The KPDES general coal permit states, “The permittee shall develop and implement a BMPP consistent with 401 KAR 5:065, Section 2(4) pursuant to KRS 224.70-110, which prevents or minimizes the potential for the release of “BMP pollutants” from ancillary activities through site runoff; spillage or leaks, sludge or waste disposal; or drainage from raw material storage. These conditions apply to all permittees who use, manufacture, store, handle, or discharge any pollutant listed as: (1) toxic under Section 307(a)(1) of the Clean Water Act; (2) oil, as defined in Section 311(a)(1) of the Act; (3) any pollutant listed as hazardous under Section 311 of the Act; or (4) is defined as a pollutant pursuant to KRS 224. 1-010(35) and who have operations which could result in (1) the release of a hazardous substance, pollutant, or contaminant, or (2) an environmental emergency, as defined in KRS 224.1-400, as amended, or any regulation promulgated pursuant thereto (hereinafter, the “BMP pollutants”). These operations include material storage areas; Plant site runoff; in-Plant transfer, process and material handling areas; loading and unloading operations, and sludge and waste disposal areas. The permittee shall implement the BMP Plan upon of the commencement of regulated activity. Modifications to the Plan as a result of ineffectiveness or Plan changes to the facility shall be implemented as soon as possible. Within 90 days of the effective date of the permit, the permittee shall evaluate the current BMP Plan and make any necessary modifications to insure its continued effectiveness. Contact us today if you would like one of these plans prepared for your site.

To see a list of all of our services go here. Contact us or request a quote today.

Macroinvertebrate Survey & Analysis

Macroinvertebrate Collection and Analysis | Aquatic Assessments

Benthic Macroinvertebrate Survey & Analysis

Benthic macroinvertebrate survey and analysis is provided by our team of aquatic entomologists and biologists. Biological Systems Consultants’ macroinvertebrate survey team is equipped to take on all of your aquatic survey needs. Our staff is fully permitted and qualified to conduct macroinvertebrate surveys in various states and can analyze your samples if needed. If you have any questions about your biological monitoring compliance needs or programs, please give us a call and we will be happy to walk you through the process and take care of all your benthic macroinvertebrate survey and analysis needs. To see a list of all of our services go here.  See more about these services here – or  Contact us or request a quote today.

Macroinvertebrate Survey and Analysis
QA/QC Training
Aquatic Biology
Benthic Macroinvertebrate Survey and Analysis
Benthic Macroinvertebrates

Macrinvertebrate Survey and Analysis

Stream & Wetland Mitigation Monitoring

Stream

Stream & Wetland Mitigation Monitoring

Section 404 Clean Water Act Mitigation compliance documentation can be very difficult due to the complexity and detail of many permit conditions. In recent years we have implemented the deployment of our EcoDrones. This technology allows us to provide high resolution aerial imagery and gives our clients the data they need to make decisions and identify potential adaptive management areas or allows to display their stream & wetland mitigation monitoring and construction efforts for marketing purposes.

Biological Systems Consultants specializes in regulatory compliance assistance and has been monitoring sites in multiple states for many years. Achievement of mitigation goals and objectives for stream restoration, stream enhancement, stream creation, and stream preservation projects has been our goal for years, with the final goal always being release of liability from the monitoring program. Biological Systems Consultants has been able to achieve these goals for their clients. Biological Systems Consultants’ stream mitigation compliance team is equipped to take on all of your mitigation compliance needs (baseline studies, during, post). Our staff is fully permitted and qualified to conduct stream and wetland mitigation surveys and has extensive experience with various habitat assessment protocols. See more about stream restoration services here or if you have any questions about your Section 404, 401 or other mitigation compliance Contact us or request a quote today. To see a list of all of our services go here.

 

Wetland Delineation

Our Services

Wetland Delineation

This week we performed a wetland delineation in Whitley County, Kentucky to fulfill requirements under Section 404 of the Clean Water Act.

The wetland delineation in Whitley County, Kentucky was conducted by BSC personnel in support of the requirements of Section 404 of the Clean Water Act (CWA). Field surveys for the following determination were conducted in accordance with the 1987 United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Wetlands Delineation Manual (USACE, 1987) and the Final Regional Supplement for the Piedmont and Eastern Mountains Region (USACE, 2012).

According to USACE “This Regional Supplement is part of a nationwide effort to address regional wetland characteristics and improve the accuracy and efficiency of wetland delineation procedures. Regional differences in climate, geology, soils,hydrology, plant and animal communities, and other factors are important to the identification and functioning of wetlands. The regional supplement was finalized in 2012 and covers all or portions of the District of Columbia and 20 states: Alabama, Arkansas, Delaware, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Maryland, Missouri, North Carolina, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia, and West Virginia” (USACE 2012).

The determination within our report is subject to review and approval by the Nashville District of the USACE. As requested by the Nashville District USACE only the area within the vicinity of the proposed work was evaluated for the wetland delineation. As indicated in our report there was a small area that appeared to meet the soils, hydrology, and vegetation characteristics for wetlands as defined by USACE. See more of our services here.

Contact us today or request a quote.

References:

United States Army Corps of Engineers. 1987. Corps of Engineers Wetlands Delineation Manual. Technical Report Y-87-1, Department of the Army, Waterways Experiment Station.

United States Army Corps of Engineers. 2012. Final Regional Supplement to the Corps of Engineers Wetland Delineation Manual: Eastern Mountains and Piedmont Region, ed. J.S. Wakeley, R.W. Lichvar, and C.V. Noble. ERDC/EL TR 10-XX. Vicksburg, MS: U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center.

 

Wetland Delineation Kentucky
Wetland Delineation Area (in Background)

Bat Habitat Assessment & Mist Netting

Kentucky Bat Survey

Bat Habitat Assessment & Mist Netting

One of our Section 7 ESA services included this bat habitat assessment and mist netting project for a planned resource extraction site, mist netting was employed following the 2016 Range Wide Indiana Bat Summer Survey Guidelines. Prior to sampling a summer and winter habitat assessment was performed. In Harlan County, Kentucky an approximately 300 acre tract of land was surveyed and clearance was recommended due to no captures of Threatened or Endangered species. Biological Systems Consultants’ bat survey team is equipped to take on all of your bat survey needs. Our staff is fully permitted and qualified to conduct surveys for the endangered Indiana Bat (Myotis sodalis), threatened Northern Long Eared Bat (Myotis septentrionalis) and other bats throughout much of their range, and has extensive experience with habitat assessments, summer and fall mist-net surveys and mine portal surveys, and acoustic monitoring and analysis. If you have any questions about your Section 7 ESA compliance or the new 4(d) rule issued for the Northern Long Eared bat, or have been requested to address bats on your project for any reason, please give us a call and we will be happy to walk you through the process and take care of all your bat survey needs. Contact us or request a quote today.

See additional services here.

Bat Habitat Assessment & Mist Netting
Mist Net Station
Bat Habitat Assessment & Mist Netting
Mist Net Station

Bat Facts: The Indiana bat(Myotis sodalis) was originally listed as being in danger of extinction under the  Endangered Species Preservation Act of 1966 (32 FR 4001, March 11, 1967), and is currently listed as endangered under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) of 1973, as amended. Their scientific name, myotis sodalis, means “mouse ears” (myotis) and “companion” (sodalis). They feed on small insects and have a typical lifespan of 14 years. After hibernation, Indiana bats move toward hardwood forests, where the females will congregate together under the loose bark of trees for their babies, and the males will roost by themselves.

 

Section 7 ESA Consultation

Section 7 ESA consultation is required for projects to identify whether any proposed or listed species are located within a given area of a proposed action. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) requires project review information to meet the requirements of Section 7(c) of the Endangered Species Act (EA) of 1973, as amended (16 U.S.C. 1531 et seq.). Potential direct, indirect, and cumulative effects to federally lusted species or their critical habitat must be considered during the evaluation. Migratory birds  must also be considered during these evaluations under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act (MBTA) and the Bald Eagle and Golden Eagle Protection Act (BGEPA). Non-federal type projects are not subject to Section 7, however, Section 9 of the Act may prohibit certain activities that may affect federally listed species. For an evaluation and consultation of your project please contact us or request a quote today. See additional services here.

Biological Assessment Using Drone (UAV, sUAS). Wetland and Stream Delineation.
Drone ESA Assessment Section 7

 

According to the USFWS website (www.fws.gov) the following provides a brief description of Section 7 ESA Consultation for informal and formal consultations:

Informal Section 7 ESA Consultation

Under Section 7, Federal agencies must consult with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) when any action the agency carries out, funds, or authorizes (such as through a permit) may affect a listed endangered or threatened species. This process usually begins as informal consultation. A Federal agency, in the early stages of project planning, approaches the Service and requests informal consultation. Discussions between the two agencies may include what types of listed species may occur in the proposed action area, and what effect the proposed action may have on those species.

If the Federal agency, after discussions with the Service, determines that the proposed action is not likely to affect any listed species in the project area, and if the Service concurs, the informal consultation is complete and the proposed project moves ahead. If it appears that the agency’s action may affect a listed species, that agency may then prepare a biological assessment to assist in its determination of the project’s effect on a species.

 Formal Section 7 ESA Consultation and the Biological Opinion

When a Federal agency determines, through a biological assessment or other review, that its action is likely to adversely affect a listed species, the agency submits to the Service a request for formal consultation. During formal consultation, the Service and the agency share information about the proposed project and the species likely to be affected. Formal consultation may last up to 90 days, after which the Service will prepare a biological opinion on whether the proposed activity will jeopardize the continued existence of a listed species. The Service has 45 days after completion of formal consultation to write the opinion.

In making a determination on whether an action will result in jeopardy, the Service begins by looking at the current status of the species, or “baseline.” Added to the baseline are the various effects – direct, indirect, interrelated, and interdependent – of the proposed Federal action. The Service also examines the cumulative effects of other non-Federal actions that may occur in the action area, including state, tribal, local, or private activities that are reasonably certain to occur in the project area.

West Virginia Selenium Fish Tissue

West Virginia Selenium Fish Tissue

Biological Systems Consultants’ West Virginia Selenium Fish Tissue survey and NPDES compliance team is equipped to take on all of your NPDES compliance needs. Recent developments in NPDES compliance include West Virginia’s 2016 revised criterion which employs water column and fish concentrations for compliance. West Virginia Selenium Fish Tissue will compliance include bioaccumulation factors which will be applied to determine water column concentrations. Collection in lakes are collected by gill nets, hook and line, or electroshocking methods according to U.S. EPA Fish Field and Laboratory Methods for Evaluating the Biological Integrity of Surface Waters. Collection in streams will be collected by standard electroshocking methods according to U.S. EPA Fish Field and Laboratory Methods for Evaluating the Biological Integrity of Surface Waters. West Virginia Selenium Fish Tissue sampling will likely be conducted before NPDES are issued and may occur throughout the lifetime of these permits. NPDES permit projects are complicated in nature and have many different project requirements. Finally, our staff is fully permitted and qualified to conduct surveys in multiple states and is prepared for each project by focusing on NPDES compliance.

Selenium Fish Tissue Sampling frequencies are conducted by Biological Systems Consultants following local and federal guidelines. Following the standard operating procedures (SOP) for selenium fish tissue sampling set forth by local regulatory authority we maintain scientific collectors permits. Hence, this allows BSC to provide field personnel with extensive experience identifying the target species as required by the protocols and helping comply with the project specific requirements mandated by the local and federal laws.

In conclusion, if you have any questions about your Section 402 NPDES Selenium Fish compliance or have been requested to address selenium fish tissue sampling on your project for any reason feel free to Contact us or request a quote today. Our fish tissue collection team strives to be cost effective and project oriented to ensure our clients receive the attention they need for each project. We will get your samples collected and analyzed in a timely and cost effective manner. See additional services here.

West Virginia Selenium Fish Tissue
Selenium Fish Tissue

Selenium Fish Tissue Testing

Selenium Fish Tissue Testing collections are conducted by Biological Systems Consultants to help our clients comply with NPDES/KPDES permits issued by the Kentucky Division of Water (KDOW) or the EPA. Following the standard operating procedures (SOP) for selenium fish tissue sampling set forth by KDOW/EPA we maintain scientific collectors permits and provide field personnel with extensive experience identifying the target species as required by the protocol. These are very time sensitive events so keep this in mind as soon as you find out you need a sampling event conducted. We collect samples and deliver to labs that are approved to run the EPA Method 200.8 sample methodology. We strive to collect and get samples analyzed by the lab in a cost effective and timely manner.

Many NPDES Permits now contain a Selenium Fish Tissue sampling trigger for collection of fish and application of EPA Method 200.8. This method identifies the amount of Selenium accumulated in the tissue of certain fish species. This methodology is outlined in the Methods for the Collection of Selenium Residue in Fish Tissue Used to Determine KPDES Permit Compliance SOP manual published by the Commonwealth of Kentucky Energy and Environment Cabinet, Department for Environmental Protection, Division of Water (KDOW, 2014).

Biological Systems Consultants’ selenium fish tissue survey and NPDES compliance team is equipped to take on all of your NPDES compliance needs. Our staff is fully permitted and qualified to conduct surveys in multiple states. If you have any questions about your Section 402 NPDES Selenium Fish compliance or have been requested to address selenium fish tissue sampling on your project for any reason Contact us or request a quote today. Our fish tissue collection team strives to be cost effective and project oriented to ensure our clients receive the attention they need for each project. This often entails following on-site safety protocols beyond that required by the State or Federal Regulations. NPDES permit projects are complicated in nature and have many different project requirements. Our NPDES staff can help with any project.

See additional services here.

Selenium Fish Tissue
Fish Tissue Sampling Collection

Selenium Fish Tissue Sampling

Selenium Fish Tissue Sampling frequencies are conducted by Biological Systems Consultants to help our clients comply with NPDES/KPDES permits issued by the Kentucky Division of Water (KDOW) or the EPA. Following the standard operating procedures (SOP) for selenium fish tissue sampling set forth by KDOW/EPA we maintain scientific collectors permits and provide field personnel with extensive experience identifying the target species as required by the protocol. These are very time sensitive events so keep this in mind as soon as you find out you need a sampling event conducted.

Many NPDES Permits now contain a Selenium Fish Tissue sampling trigger for collection of fish and application of EPA Method 200.8. This method identifies the amount of Selenium accumulated in the tissue of certain fish species. This methodology is outlined in the Methods for the Collection of Selenium Residue in Fish Tissue Used to Determine KPDES Permit Compliance SOP manual published by the Commonwealth of Kentucky Energy and Environment Cabinet, Department for Environmental Protection, Division of Water (KDOW, 2014).

Biological Systems Consultants’ selenium fish tissue survey and NPDES compliance team is equipped to take on all of your NPDES compliance needs. Our staff is fully permitted and qualified to conduct surveys in multiple states. If you have any questions about your Section 402 NPDES Selenium Fish compliance or have been requested to address selenium fish tissue sampling on your project for any reason Contact us or request a quote today. Our fish tissue collection team strives to be cost effective and project oriented to ensure our clients receive the attention they need for each project. This often entails following on-site safety protocols beyond that required by the State or Federal Regulations. NPDES permit projects are complicated in nature and have many different project requirements. Our NPDES staff can help with any project. See additional services here.

Selenium Fish Tissue
Fish Tissue Sampling Collection

Phase I Archaeology – Clay County, Kentucky

Phase I Archaeology
Historic Headstone

Phase I Archaeology

This Phase I Archaeology project purpose was to identify any archaeological resources within the project area and assess their potential eligibility for nomination to the National Register of Historic Places (NRHP). As a result of the investigation, one historic/modern cemetery was documented. It was located atop of a toeslope near about 600 feet AMSL. The site encompassed approximately 1000 square meters and is about 200m south of the head of a tributary that drains Franks Creek. The entire cemetery is maintained and surrounded by a chain-link fence. The cemetery contained 13 graves, all of which were oriented north-south. Of the 13 graves, 9 were either marked by plain stone, or the writing was worn away and no longer visible. The other headstones contained legible information such as dates of birth and names. 4 of the graves were considered modern, with death dates ranging from   1971-2002. It is likely that graves marked with plain or illegible headstones are historic in age.

By placing a 100 foot buffer zone around the cemetery avoidance of the site was possible and no further work was recommended for this project. No additional sites were located during this survey. Contact us or request a quote today. See additional services here.